Cases

Print Mail Logistics Limited v Warratah Investments Pty Ltd [2018] FCA 1618

CORPORATIONS – application to set aside a statutory demand or in the alternative for a permanent injunction – where creditor has refused to assign securities – whether the affidavit accompanying the statutory demand met the requirements of s 459E(3) of the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) (Act) – whether creditor is intentionally acting to impair securities that ought to be available for a guarantor or an incoming financier upon payment of the principal debt – whether the Court should set aside the demand on the basis of s 459H(1) or s 459J(1)(b) of the Act or grant a permanent injunction – application allowed.

David Rayment represented the Plaintiff.

Reasons for the decision can be found here.

Wondal v Inspector-General in Bankruptcy [2018] FCA 1278

From the Federal Court of Australian

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW – appeal from Administrative Appeals Tribunal on questions of law – where Tribunal had affirmed a decision of the Inspector-General in Bankruptcy to refuse to extend the time in which the applicant could file an application for review of the remuneration of her trustees – whether Tribunal denied the applicant procedural fairness – whether there was no evidence to support findings made by the Tribunal – whether Tribunal failed to consider applicant’s submissions – whether Tribunal’s reasons were inadequate.

David Rayment represented the Respondent.

Reasons for judgment can be found here.

 

Luo v Windy Hills Australian Game Meats Pty Ltd (No 2) [2018] NSWSC 1139 (24 July 2018)

PRACTICE & PROCEDURE – COSTS – Security for costs – individual plaintiff ordinarily resident outside Australia – corporate defendant admittedly unable to meet a costs order – whether security for costs should be refused because of the merits of the plaintiffs’ claim – relevance of defendants’ failure to comply with undertaking given to the Court – whether ordering security will stultify proceedings – other factors said to be relevant to exercise of discretion

David Rayment represented the Plaintiffs/Respondents.

Reasons for the decision can be found here.

Parsons and ANOR & MASSON

From the Family Court of Australia:

FAMILY LAW – APPEAL – CHILDREN – Relocation – Two children born as a result of artificial conception procedures – Where the first appellant is the biological and birth mother of both children, the second appellant is a parent of the youngest child by operation of s 60H of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) (“the federal Act”) and the respondent is the biological father of the eldest child – Where the primary judge found the respondent is a “legal parent” of the eldest child, allowed him extensive time with both children and restrained the appellants from relocating – Where the primary judge only applied the federal Act – In a case heard in federal jurisdiction it is mandatory for s 79 of the Judiciary Act 1903 (Cth) to be applied – Rizeq v Western Australia (2017) 91 ALJR 707 and Northern Territory of Australia v GPAO (1999) 196 CLR 553 considered – No constitutional reason why s 79 of the Judiciary Act 1903 (Cth) ought not apply to “pick up” the Status of Children Act 1996 (NSW) (“the State Act”) – Held s 60H of the federal Act does not “otherwise provide” within the meaning of s 79 of the Judiciary Act – Section 14 of the State Act must therefore be applied – The respondent is presumed not to be the father of the eldest child – Section 60H of the federal Act does not enlarge the category of persons entitled to the status of “parent” as there can only be two parents for the purposes of the federal Act – Held primary judge erred in finding the respondent is a “legal parent” of the eldest child – Appeal allowed – Matter remitted – Costs certificates issued.

Michelle McMahon represented the first and second appellants.

Reasons for Judgement can be found here.

Stevenson v Ashton

From the Civil and Administrative Tribunal New South Wales:

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION – Home Building – successor in title seeking compensation for allegedly defective work from owner-builder – when work was complete – defective work – whether major defect – whether defect in a major element – what constitutes waterproofing – cost of rectification – whether work order should be made in respect of defective work carried out pursuant to owner-builder permit.

Michelle McMahon represented the Respondent.

Reasons for Decision can be found here.

 

Sabharwal v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2018] FCA 10

From the Federal Court of Australia:

MIGRATION – application for judicial review of a decision of the Minister to refuse a visa under s 501(1) of the Migration Act 1958 (Cth) – whether Minister misconstrued or misapplied s 501(6)(d)(i) of the Act – whether Minister required to give consideration to a psychologist’s report

Dr Stephen Tully appeared pro bono for the applicant.

Sydney Tools Pty Ltd v Robert Bosch (Australia) Pty Ltd [2017] NSWSC 1709

From the Supreme Court of New South Wales:

CONTRACTS - existence of a contract - “postal rule” - whether Trading Agreement contained obligation to supply absent acceptance of an order - - HELD: no executed contract - no obligation to supply - PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE - Practice Notice SC Eq 3 para 50 - “stop-watch” method of trial

David Rayment appeared for the Defendant.

Elias v Alloha Formwork & Construction Pty Ltd [2017] NSWSC 1546

From the Supreme Court of New South Wales:

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION – Home Building Act 1989 – Statutory warranties – Breach – Calculation of damages for cost of rectification of defects – Calculation of delay costs
CONSUMER LAW – Australian Consumer Law s 18 – Misleading or deceptive conduct – Whether defendants made representations – Whether representations were misleading or deceptive – Whether plaintiffs relied on representations
CONTRACTS – Breach of contract – Consequences of breach – Right to damages – Whether plaintiff entitled to costs of rectifying defects in building or cost of demolition and rebuild
CONTRACTS – Building and construction – Formation – Whether first defendant entered into contract with plaintiffs – Whether contract varied by agreement
CONTRACTS – Remedies – Damages – Remoteness of damage – Whether plaintiff’s impecuniosity must be taken into account in determining what loss is reasonably foreseeable
CONTRACTS – Termination of contract – Repudiation – Whether first defendant repudiated contract – Whether plaintiffs accepted repudiation
NEGLIGENCE – Duty of care – Breach – Whether third defendant breached duty of care in issuing construction certificates – Whether plaintiffs suffered loss as consequence of defendants’ breach

Michelle McMahon was led by Andrew Pickles SC for the plaintiffs.

LFDB v SM [2017] FCAFC 178

From the Full Federal Court of Australia:

PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW – appeal from the dismissal by the primary judge of an application under s 72(1) of the Trans-Tasman Proceedings Act 2010 (Cth)to set aside the registration of a judgment of the High Court of New Zealand in relation to proceedings under the Property (Relationships) Act 1976 (NZ) – whether enforcement of judgment would be contrary to public policy in Australia

Dr Christopher Ward SC and Dr Stephen Tully successfully appeared for the respondent.

Rekrut and Scott v Champion Homes Sales Pty Ltd; Champion Homes Sales Pty Ltd v Rekrut and Scott [2017] NSWCATAP 187

From the NSW Civil & Administrative Tribunal:

APPEAL – whether leave to appeal should be granted – whether Tribunal below failed to give adequate reasons – whether Tribunal below failed to consider claims – whether no evidence to support findings made below
  
EXTENSION OF TIME – whether extension of time needed – application of Civil and Administrative Rules 2014 (NSW) rr 6 and 13 and Interpretation Act 1987 (NSW) s 76 – whether extension of time should be granted

Michelle McMahon appeared for Adam Rekrut and Sandra Scott.

Odzic v Commonwealth of Australia (as represented by the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development) [2017] FCAFC 28

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW – whether the Federal Circuit Court (Commonwealth Tenancy Disputes) Instrument 2015 (Cth) (Instrument) was ultra vires s 10AA(3) of the Federal Circuit Court of Australia Act 1999 (Cth) to make provision for and in relation to all or any of specified matters in respect of a Commonwealth tenancy dispute – whether a provision of the Instrument commenced before the day the Instrument was registered for the purposes of s 12 of the Legislation Act 2003 (Cth)

 

APPEAL AND NEW TRIAL – appeal from Federal Circuit Court of Australia – claimed errors in fact-finding by primary judge – claimed errors in primary judge’s exercise of power under s 85 of the Residential Tenancies Act 2010 (NSW) as modified by the Federal Circuit Court (Commonwealth Tenancy Disputes) Instrument 2015 (Cth) – whether error in appropriate date for vacant possession – whether error by the primary judge in suspending the order for vacant possession – whether to grant application that, in an appeal, the Court receive further evidence

 

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW – separation of judicial and executive powers – where Residential Tenancies Act 2010 (NSW) conferring power on State Tribunal was made the applicable law for Commonwealth tenancy disputes in the Federal Circuit Court of Australia involving land in New South Wales – whether acquisition of property other than on just terms – whether there was a “matter” within the meaning of Ch III of the Constitution – whether it was beyond the legislative power of the Parliament to make s 10AA of the Federal Circuit Court of Australia Act 1999 (Cth) and the Federal Circuit Court (Commonwealth Tenancy Disputes) Instrument 2015 (Cth) 

 

LANDLORD AND TENANT – application by Commonwealth as lessor to the Federal Circuit Court of Australia for a termination order for a residential tenancy agreement where the tenant had been in continual possession of the same residential premises for a period of less than 20 years – whether predominant use of premises for the purposes of agriculture or business within s 7(h) of the Residential Tenancies Act 2010 (NSW) – whether errors in primary judge’s exercise of power under s 85 of the Residential Tenancies Act 2010 (NSW) as modified by the Federal Circuit Court (Commonwealth Tenancy Disputes) Instrument 2015 (Cth) – whether error in appropriate date for vacant possession

 

PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE – application for an adjournment – whether leave should be granted to amend grounds of appeal – whether to grant application that, in an appeal, the Court receive further evidence

David Rayment represented the Respondent.

Reasons for the decision can be found here.

Rizeq v Western Australia [2017] HCA 23

From the High Court of Australia:

Constitutional law (Cth) – Courts – State courts – Federal jurisdiction – Diversity jurisdiction – Where appellant resident of New South Wales – Where appellant indicted for offence against law of Western Australia – Where matter between State and resident of another State within meaning of s 75(iv) of Constitution – Where District Court of Western Australia exercising federal jurisdiction – Whether provisions of State Act picked up and applied as Commonwealth law – Whether s 79 of Judiciary Act 1903 (Cth) operates in respect of s 6(1)(a) of Misuse of Drugs Act 1981 (WA) – Whether s 79 of Judiciary Act 1903 (Cth) operates in respect of s 114(2) of Criminal Procedure Act 2004 (WA).

Criminal law – Appeal against conviction – Where trial by jury in federal jurisdiction – Where majority verdict of guilty returned – Whether unanimous jury verdict required by s 80 of Constitution – Whether majority jury verdict permitted under s 114(2) of Criminal Procedure Act 2004 (WA).

Words and phrases – "accrued jurisdiction", "diversity jurisdiction", "Federal Judicature", "federal jurisdiction", "jurisdiction", "matter", "picked up and applied", "power", "State jurisdiction", "State legislative capacity", "trial by jury".

Dr James Stellios assisted Matthew Howard SC in representing the appellant.

Menzies v Paccar Financial Pty Ltd [2016] FCA 400 (21 April 2016)

PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE – whether proceeding should be summarily dismissed – whether applicants precluded by Anshunestoppel from obtaining claims under Independent Contractors Act 2006 (Cth) – whether Supreme Court of New South Wales invested with federal jurisdiction with respect to such claims – whether unreasonable for applicants to refrain from making such claims in earlier proceedings – whether claims for malicious prosecution and abuse of process have any reasonable prospect of success.

David Rayment represented the Respondents.

Reasons for the decision can be found here.

Hampton & Heath and Ors [2017] FamCA 132 (8 March 2017)

From the Family Court of Australia:

FAMILY LAW – CHILDREN – Best Interests of the children – Where there is a risk of harm to the children in the care of each parent – Where there are allegations of family violence – Where the first respondent father perpetrated family violence – Where there are concerns regarding the mental health of the first respondent father – Where there are concerns regarding the drug use of the parties – Where the second respondent father has been convicted of assaulting one of the children – Where each of the parties has a criminal record – Where the mother was abused as a child – Where the mother identifies as Aboriginal – Where there are concerns about the mother’s ability to cope with four children – Where the youngest child lives with the paternal uncle – Where the sibling relationships are significant – Where there are concerns about the capacity of each parent to meet the needs of the children – Where there is an unacceptable risk of harm to the children in the care of each parent – Where the children should have a connection to their Aboriginal heritage – Where the Department of Family and Community Services is to have sole parental responsibility for the children – Where the children spend time with the mother – Where the child spends time with the second respondent father – Where the children spend time with the first respondent father.

Dr Stephen Tully appeared for the First Respondent.